4 Tips to Encourage Summer Programming

The school year is winding down, but that doesn’t mean the learning has to. Kids who continue learning through the summer see learning benefits for up to two years afterward. You can help your students continue to grow as learners by encouraging them to continue programming at home. Here are a few quick and easy tips!

1. Send home Kodable log in details for parents.

Parents will be looking for educational programs to keep their kiddos occupied this summer. You can easily print log in instructions for all your students and send home instructions for parents to facilitate more programming!

2. Start a Summer Coding Challenge

Challenge your students to set their own learning goal for the summer! Students will share something they learned this year and something they want to learn over the summer. They will set a goal for the number of programs they want to write and can even track their progress to share with their friends next year!

3. Celebrate a year of learning with certificates for students

Recognize your students’ achievements with a certificate they can take home. Proud learners love showing off their skills! Encourage them to keep learning with positive reinforcement.

4. Open next year’s concepts for early practice.

Get students excited for next school year by letting them explore the concepts they’ll be learning next year. You can easily adjust the grade level on your classes, so they’ll have access to the next set of units without moving too far ahead. Early access will give them a point of reference when you’re teaching the concepts next year!

Keep up all the great work and enjoy a fun and well earned summer vacation!

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12 Questions on Coding and Startups at Kodable

A couple months ago, one of our longest-tenured Kodable users sent me an email for a student in her class. She wanted to learn more about computer science, problem solving, and startups, and had a few questions she wanted to ask me. I wanted to share my answers with the rest of the coding community in the hopes that they might help other young learners out there 🙂

Student Q: How do you use your programming skills to be a better problem solver?

Jon’s Answer: Programming is nothing more than a problem that you have to solve with code! When you program, you learn very quickly that the best way to solve a problem is to break things down into a series of smaller problems that are much easier to solve. The same is true for problems that you face in your everyday life. If your room is messy, its easiest just to get started by picking up one thing and putting it away than staring at the room trying to figure out how you’re going to clean up this huge mess!

Student Q: What steps do you follow when you are problem solving?

Jon’s Answer: When I program, I have to break everything down into a sequence of smaller tasks. That lets me think about the problem in smaller “chunks” instead of being overwhelmed by some huge programming project. After I’ve broken down the problem into a series of tasks I have to complete, then I just start with the first one! Every time I complete a task, I then stop and make sure that I did it correctly, and I’m still moving towards the goal I set out for myself when I started. After I’ve completed all of the tasks, I remember what my original goal was and make sure that it was accomplished.

Student Q: How does computational thinking help us understand our world and solve problems?

Jon’s Answer: I started learning how to program when I was 6, and although I didn’t realize it at the time, I learned to think of everything in terms of ‘if I do this, then that will happen’. This was so important! It helped me be more successful in everything I did, because I always thought about the effects of my actions before I did them. This helped everywhere from taking math tests to troubleshooting when my wifi wasn’t working. Also, computers are everywhere! Computers think computationally (obviously), and if you understand how they ‘think,’ it’ll be much easier or you to work with them.

Student Q: Which one of the problem solving steps is your favorite/ easy for you?

Jon’s Answer: I like breaking a big problem into smaller tasks. Its like a strategy! You get to take this big complicated problem and make it much more straightforward.

Student Q: Which step is your least favorite/ hardest for you?

Jon’s Answer: I enjoy completing tasks, so don’t always like stopping after every task and making sure that I’m moving towards the right goal – I just want to keep going! But this is very, very important. You can get so caught up in each task that you can end up moving in the complete wrong direction. Before you’ve noticed, you could have spent two or three hours working on the wrong problem, and thats never fun.

Student Q: Is feedback helpful when you are coming up with solutions?

Jon’s Answer: Of course! Its always helpful to get a second set of eyes on a problem you’re working on – especially if you’ve been working on it for a long time. You just want to make sure that you accurately explain the problem to whoever is giving you feedback, or they could give you the answer to a different problem!

Student Q: What do you do to plan/ prepare your solution to a problem?

Jon’s Answer: I try to map out everything I’m going to do in a set of easily completable tasks. It is very important not to make these tasks too big, you should find things that can be done relatively quickly. Then I order them so I know which tasks I need to complete first, second, and so on.

Student Q: What are some ways to reflect or evaluate when you solve a problem?

Jon’s Answer: You should always know what you were trying to do when you solve a problem. Ideally, this means that you clearly defined what ‘finished’ was before you even started solving the problem, that way you can easily determine if you accomplished your goal. Its also a good idea to look at your problem solving process and find areas you can improve next time. Did you spend too long in one area? Could you have skipped a step? Did you keep finding things to do that you hadn’t planned for? This kind of experience is incredibly valuable to becoming a better problem solver.

Student Q: Why do you think it is necessary to ask questions before you find a solution to the problem?

Jon’s Answer: Nobody knows everything, and even if you think you have all of the answers you might not! The only way to really know if you’re going about solving the problem correctly is if you ask questions. Sometimes there are details that you might have overlooked, or you might have misunderstood a part of the problem.

Student Q: Do you think that it is essential to follow a process when problem solving?

Jon’s Answer: Instead of a “process,” I think that it is essential to have a “problem-solving game plan.” I used to play football, and our coaches would always have a game plan before the game. One of the most important aspects of a game plan is that it needs to be flexible, because you can’t anticipate what’s going to happen during the game. Similarly, every problem you face is going to be different, so you should always have an idea of what kind of strategy you’re going to use when you problem solve, but be flexible enough to adapt it to individual situations.

Student Q: How did you come up with the idea for Kodable?

Jon’s Answer: I started to program when I was 6. This was awhile ago, long before there were so many kid-friendly resources available! My first computer used a text-based operating system called MS-DOS and didn’t even have a mouse. However, after a few years, I lost interest, and moved on to other things. When I got to college, I was able to teach myself how to program really easily because I had learned how to think like a programmer when I was so young. When I was working with my cofounder on another idea, we kept having parents tell us how they wanted to teach their kids how to program, but didn’t know how or where to start. We put two and two together, and came up with Kodable!

Student Q: How long did it take to make the whole company?

Jon’s Answer: My cofounder and I started working on Kodable in 2012, so we’ve been working on Kodable for a full 4 years now. Kodable’s birthday is actually the same as mine, October 20th. 😄

Build Classroom Community with Coding Team Builders!

Back to school means old faces, new faces, and getting to know each other in a new classroom community. We know fostering collaboration and building an emotionally supportive environment positively impacts academic achievement and developing a community from the start is key.

Team building activities that promote critical thinking and collaborative problem-solving are a great way to kick off the year with your students and develop a strong sense of community that works together from day one. Traditional team builders like “The Human Knot” are great, but what if we could use coding and computer science concepts to get to know each other?

Here’s how:

Variables

In programming, variables store information in a program. The information is referred to as values, and can be either text or numbers. You can think of a variable like a container with a label that stores related items inside.

Strings

A string is a variable that stores values that are groups of characters, like a word or phrase. A great example of a string variable is a name: a name is a value that is used to identify a person.

Name Games: Back to school name games that help students get to know each other are a great opportunity to introduce string variables. Explain to students that they represent a variable and their name is a string that is a value associated with them. There are tons of name games out there, get creative and have fun!

A simple and silly name game that can get students thinking about string variables can be as basic as students going around a circle and choosing a word that goes with their name (their favorite food, sport, a rhyme, or a letter that matches the first letter in their name). For example, “Ashley Apples” or “Mike Bike”. Everyone says their own name and the names that came before to help get to know each other!

Integers

Integers are values that are written and stored as numbers.  Integers are variables that store values just like strings, only the values are numbers and not words.

Paper Bag Share:  Each student has a paper bag and labels the bag with a word or topic that describes something about them. The topic must relate to the student and needs to be something expressed in numbers. Get students thinking about things they have that will tell a little bit about them.

An example would be labeling the bag “Siblings” or “Pets”.  Students would write on a piece of paper how many siblings or pets they have (0, 2, 4, etc.) and place the value inside the bag. You can have students choose any topic  to represent a variable and have them place a related value inside.

Arrays

Arrays are ordered lists of variables that include both strings and integers. Arrays keep related values organized and in a specific order.

Time Capsule: As a class, make a time capsule for the year that represents an array.

  • Name the array based on the grade or class name, like “4th Grade.”
  • Students write down their expectations and goals for each month of the school year on separate pieces of paper.
  • Students place each of the 10 “values” inside the time capsule in order from September to June, keeping the values organized chronologically in the time capsule.

Object-Oriented Programming: Objects, Classes, and Properties

Objects and Classes

Classes hold information about an object and allow us to create new, individual objects based on these details. A helpful way to explain classes and objects to students is to think of basic classification: grouping objects based on their similarities and differences.

Activities that allow students to explore their similarities and differences will help students understand classes and objects in programming while getting to know each other.

Properties

Properties are special types of variables that are attached to an object and describe it.

Students can think about themselves as an object and things that they have as properties. Any team building activities that allow students to describe themselves and each other will help students understand properties and objects in programming.

We’ve gone ahead and created a sample activity for you that will help students in grades 3-5 learn about variables and properties while engaging in back to school team building.  Get it here:

DL Team Builders Here

Like what you see or have ideas? Leave it in the comments below!

Code your Back to School Procedures!

An elementary classroom without clear procedures for daily routines means chaos. As you head back to school and get your classroom operating like a well-oiled machine, consider including some coding concepts to make it fun and frontload computer science lessons you’ll teach later in the year!

How do classroom procedures relate to coding concepts?

Every transition throughout the day requires clear, rehearsed routines that keep everyone safe and in an efficient learning environment. Procedures help us avoid wasting precious time, keep students on track, and allow for 30+ humans to function together in one room- a miraculous feat when you think about it.

Procedures require order, rules, and often silly names that direct students to perform a certain set of actions (think “Criss-Cross Applesauce,” “Put a bubble in,” etc.). These are all elements of programming concepts used in programs to direct a computer to carry out tasks- making them perfect examples of how we can relate programming to real life for our students.

Sequence

We know that in programming, sequence is the order that commands are executed by a computer which allows us to carry out tasks that have multiple steps. In programming, we direct the computer to perform multiple steps in the correct order and it allows us to carry out a task.

In the classroom, students have to perform multi-step tasks as well, such as washing their hands, transitioning to lunch, or coming in from recess. Think about some routines that are specific to your classroom and how they are a sequence of steps put together: this is just like how a computer carries out tasks and will help students understand this process for computers.

Conditions

In programming, conditions are basic “if, then” logic statements that modify how code is executed; making them a key part of the decision-making process for computers. Conditional statements are basic cause and effect: “If this, then that.”

In the classroom, students experience conditional statements daily as they follow classroom rules and guidelines (or break them!).  Using conditional statements will help students think about and set classroom norms together, and make conditional statements easier to understand in programming down the road. Integrating conditional statements into classroom procedures will help students understand how stories can alter and the role programmers play in changing a computer program’s path.

Functions

Criss Cross Apple Sauce Function

 

In programming, a function is a named sequence of steps that can be reused and easily called on over and over again.

 

Classroom management strategies are a great example of a function: teaching students a sequence of steps and giving it a silly name that you can say without having to direct students through each step in the process, every time.

In the classroom, functions can be a lifesaver! Getting students to do a series of tasks in one motion by calling out a  name can keep things in order and on task; which is what we all want for a productive learning environment.

We’ve taken the time to make k-2 example mini-lessons that you can easily tailor to your own classroom procedures:

Download Mini Lessons Here

To help yourself understand the programming concepts and how they can be used with your back to school procedures, watch our videos and share your ideas in the comments below!

New and Improved Tools for Teaching Coding

Last week your students got an upgrade to Kodable with the release of Bug World on iOS, but now it’s your turn! We’re always listening to your feedback and as a result has made some changes to your teacher dashboard that we think you’ll LOVE!

When you’re getting started teaching computer science, getting to your first class is crucial. So many teachers feel overwhelmed by all the choices, tools, and new content that they never make it to this point. However, if you make it to your first class, you’re 60% more likely to continue with computer science in your classroom. It is our priority to help teachers reach this point. Over the years, you may have received an email or call from a member of the Kodable team offering support to help you get to this point or asking questions about what stopped you.

This method has helped hundreds of teachers get started, and we look forward to many more of these conversations. Kodable has grown to be in 1 in 4 elementary schools and there are just too many teachers to reach everyone individually. We wanted to find a way to replicate this process for others who we weren’t able to reach.

 

Introducing your new Kodable Concierge

This new to do list on your teacher dashboard will point you in the right direction to find what’s next for you and your students. It’s like having a member of the Kodable team right there to guide you through every step of your coding journey.

 

Walk through each step toward teaching your first class.

Step1

Your to-do list takes you to the current lesson materials. 

LessonMaterials

When you complete lesson plans, your to-do list will tell you which one is up next.  

UpNext

 

 

Online lesson plans for easier planning

Before the to-do list, many, many teachers had no idea that we offered so many great resources, lesson plans, and activities in our curriculum. Now, each part of the curriculum is easier than ever to access. Every lesson plan is accessible in a digital format straight from your teacher dashboard!

View each concept

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Mark lessons complete, tracking what’s next

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This is the first step in our plan to make them all available inside the Kodable app. Having resources all in one place makes planning for your first (of many!) programming lesson.

Quickly evaluate what your students are learning

After teaching your first lesson in computer science there is usually a rush of emotions! The one we hear the most is excitement. However, often administrators and teachers are concerned about how to measure student outcomes. To accompany the qualitative evaluation built into each of our lesson plans, teachers have always valued our quantitative data.  Now you have easier access to all your student’s progress on your teacher dashboard.

View each of your classes

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View weekly snapshots of your students’ progress

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Our goal has always been to make teaching computer science as effortless and fun as possible for both students and educators. Therefore, we’re always listening to what they have to say about how we can improve. Enjoy the new tools made especially for you, and let us know what you think! We’re here to help and listen. Thank you for all that you do.

5 Tips for Making Purchases in Education

Education is changing! I’m sure you feel it too. You don’t have to choose between three educational content providers. There are hundreds of growing companies eager to solve challenges and needs of 21st-century classrooms. New technologies and new choices are making it easier than ever to meet the needs of all the world’s children! But now schools, educators, and companies are adjusting their purchasing processes to the 21st Century and it is proving to be challenging.

The Education Industry Association recently partnered with the Center for Research and Reform in Education at Johns Hopkins University to better understand the challenges and areas for innovation in the rapidly changing world of education. They found that only 4% of companies think that today’s ed-tech procurement processes meet contemporary needs resulting in higher product costs. The same is true on the educator’s side of purchasing. Only 36% of curriculum directors report satisfaction with time spent on procurement.

Just like in life, examining these shortcomings lead to some great ideas on how we can improve!

1. Seeing is believing!

The number one way to get funding approved is to test it in your school or classroom. Over 60% of districts rely on end user recommendations to make decisions. Once you feel confident about using this new tool, invite your principal or administrator to see the magic.  Who can deny that engagement?!

2. Start with a small pilot

As an extension of number one, remember you don’t have to start with your entire district or school. In fact, 62% of districts rely on pilots to make larger purchasing decisions.  Administrators work hard to meet the needs of everyone, and sometimes that means starting small and working your way up.

We work with districts across the country who selected 10-30% of their schools or teachers to test Kodable. Many of the districts that use Kodable now, started with one school or grade level. After a successful roll out, they decided to include more locations in the coding fun. Pilots are a fantastic way to prove the feasibility and results of a product.

3. More than an app

Apps are rarely allotted any district funds, but many companies offer far more than what is apparent in their student facing app. Check their resources and website to make sure you’re getting the most out of the product. In our experience, teachers who use the Kodable lesson plans and progress tracking are far more likely to get support from their administrators.

We often set up onboarding calls with educators to help them feel confident getting the most out of our curriculum. Do your research to see what options are available to you from the company. If you’re planning to work a new product into your curriculum, let administrators see you using all the resources it has to offer. If you know how to use the product successfully, it will be clear and you can explain the benefits more effectively.

4. Parents can help

Parents are amazing allies. If you have a supportive PTA or room parent, ask them to come watch a lesson. Talk to them about the benefits of the tool you’re using and why it is helping their children. At the very least you’ll get some support to talk to your administrator about. Some teachers have success with fundraising as a class, having a bake sale, or asking each parent to donate a few dollars.

Turning to parents has been especially successful with computer science. Parents see the benefit of knowing how to code every day at work. We have a template letter to parents available here.

5. Be proactive about purchasing

Once you make a decision to purchase, don’t let the process stall.  Everyone wants to ensure the right decision is being made, which is why research, pilots, and recommendations are so helpful. However, only 36% of curriculum directors say they are satisfied with the time it takes to make purchases. Learn about your district’s purchasing processes so you can have an impact on the amount of time it takes to implement a new solution.

I’ve spent the past two years learning about purchasing in education. There are so many ways that a great product can get lost in the shuffle. Teacher’s voices are valued and heard, but so many aren’t sure how to share their opinion.

We recently added purchase processing to the Kodable teacher dashboard. It follows the purchasing process of the majority of districts.  From there you can see exactly where you are in the process and you can keep everyone involved moving forward.

  1. Simply request a quote, then you can send it to the principal or director responsible for approving it.
  2. Your administrator can approve it and easily pass it on to the business office for purchasing.

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Each person in an organization has a role in the purchasing decision. It’s a complicated system, but we’re all working together to improve it. If you’re using Kodable with your students, check out our new purchasing page, it’s our first step toward putting purchasing power in the hands of educators.

 

Teachers – Voice your opinion to get the ball rolling.

Principals – Participate in pilots to prove results and find something your teachers will like using.

Directors and Superintendents – Identify individuals who you know will have helpful feedback on products and student outcomes when testing new ideas.

Companies – Provide resources and reliable data to your users so they can make the best decision.

 

Sources: Education Industry Association, and Digital Promise. “Improving Ed-Tech Purchasing.” Digital Promise, Mar. 2015. Web. 30 Mar. 2016.

http://www.digitalpromise.org/blog/entry/improving-ed-tech-purchasing

5 Tips for a Successful Back to School Night

Back to School Night is an exciting time to engage with families and start building relationships that will benefit students throughout the year and beyond.  Back to School Night typically comes after a full day of teaching, sometimes with a staff meeting sandwiched between the two.


Here are 5 tips that helped me with 5 successful Back to School Nights when I was teaching:

1. Set yourself up for success – Put out sign in sheets

In addition to having a main sign in sheet available when parents enter the room, placing one at every table proactively mitigates missing names and contact information for anyone in attendance. Sending an appreciation note, text, or e-mail the next day to those on the list is always a great starting point for parent communication.

2. Everyone likes to know what to expect – Give your guests an agenda

Having hard copies of the agenda on tables allows parents to relax, take their eyes of the clock, and engage with your presentation. No one really likes surprises, especially when little ones are in tow, dinner is waiting at home, or preparation for a busy tomorrow is looming.

3. Get organized – Recruit students to help set up your classroom

Intentionally organize your classroom for the evening and have materials ready (recruit student help!). Important, often overlooked details to keep in mind:

  • Chairs available for extra seating
  • Space for activities that require movement (icebreakers, classroom tours, time to mingle)
  • A designated area for parent belongings
  • Handouts and resources printed and easily accessible
  • Writing utensils for filling out forms, notes, etc

4. First impressions are important – Save time with a Presentation Template

Plan and set up your presentation in advance. A successful presentation is:

  • Timed. Make sure you run through it beforehand and it isn’t too short or too long!
  • Clear
  • Collaborative: allows for parents to ask questions, actively engage, and supports a strong, parent-teacher team.
  • Student-friendly. Have students participate by handing out materials, assisting parents in demos, and available as guest speakers to talk about their classroom.
  • Compatible with the technology you will use to present
  • Tested in advance- there is nothing worse than a presentation that won’t load or sound that won’t work with a room of silent parents looking at you!

    *Note: We’ve gone ahead and designed a presentation for you to use on your Back to School Night. We hope this eliminates the time you would spend planning, and we hope you’ll share it with other teachers! All you need to do is click the image below to download the Kodable Back to School Night Resource Kit. Enter your school/classroom information and fill in your agenda.

    Copy of EST. 2015

 

5. Have fun!

Back to School Night is an exciting opportunity to start building relationships with families. Let parents mingle, get to know each other, and get to know you! Include parents in your focus for the year and communicate clearly that this is a team you’re excited to be a part of it.

 

New Kodable Dashboard is Live

Exciting news from Kodable HQ! After finishing up some major updates to Kodable Web, we are ready to release our new Teacher Dashboard! As of this moment, our new Teacher Dashboard is live and available for Public Beta in your Kodable Teacher Account.

To start using the new Kodable Dashboard, follow these instructions:

1. Visit Kodable.com

2. Log into your Teacher Account

3. Click on link in the header to try the new dashboard!

Kodable Dashboard Public Beta

4. Presto! Welcome to your new Teacher Dashboard!

Kodable Dashboard is ready to use

What’s new on the Teacher Dashboard?

Our new Kodable Teacher Dashboard is loaded with a ton of new features to help you with get the most out of your Kodable Curriculum.

View CCSS Standards in Progress and Completed

You can complete many CCSS standards using Kodable. Take a look at what standards your students are working on, and which ones they have completed.

CCSS Standards in progress and completed

View Lessons Completed

Quickly glance at your class’ progress and see what lessons they have yet to complete.

Quickly view your progress

Manage Administrator Access

Kodable School account holders can now easily manage their school’s Teacher Accounts from a single page.

Manage your teacher accounts as an administrator

View Assignments and Curriculum Resources

Introducing the new Kodable Curriculum! Learn Sequence, Conditions, Loops, Functions, and Debugging using Kodable’s learning guides, unplugged activities, video tutorials, and lessons.

Assignments Tab in Kodable

View and Edit all of your students

Quickly view and edit all of your students in every class from a single page.

View All Students and make bulk changes

 Stay tuned for more updates coming soon!

 

 

Introducing the Kodable Programming Curriculum

Kodable Programming Curriculum for Elementary

When we founded Kodable, we made it our goal to bring programming to every classroom around the world. In order to make this dream a reality, we have decided to take the next step in teaching coding, and transition from a game to a complete programming curriculum. For those just starting out, developing your own coding curriculum can be a daunting task. That’s where we can help. From now on, all of our updates will work to provide teachers with all of the resources, materials, and metrics that they need to teach their students programming. Take a look at the exciting changes we have made so far.

New Features of the Kodable Programming Curriculum

In 2014, we heard a lot of awesome feedback from the Kodable Community about how to make Kodable even better. You spoke, we listened, and we are now thrilled to introduce the new Kodable Programming Curriculum.

Native Desktop Application (Currently In Beta)

Kodable Desktop Application

Kodable can now be accessed and played right from your desktop. Kodable Desktop works with any hardware, and syncs all student data to the cloud so they can resume their progress on any device.

Administrative Tools (NEW) 


Kodable School Teachers can now manage multiple Teacher Accounts from one Administrative Account. Invite existing teachers, create new accounts, and view all of your classes/students from one dashboard.

Redesigned Dashboard (UPDATES COMING THROUGHOUT MARCH)

Class Dashboard (New)

Easily manage, view, and track class/student progress from your Teacher Account Dashboard. See what standards your class has completed, and quickly identify students that are struggling.

Kodable Dashboards Assignments

Plan, organize, and access your lessons from the new Assignments tab. Create a custom lesson playlist, or use the provided lesson guides to help you conquer your first programming lessons.

Learning Guides & Curriculum Activities (SNEEK PEEK) 

Kodable Learning Guide: Sequence

Prepare to teach your students Sequence and Condition programming concepts with our revised Learning Guides. Make connections to programming concepts outside of Kodable with unplugged activities for your classroom.

Try our new Sequence Activity –>

In Case You Missed It: Recent Updates

Add More Free Students to Your Class 

Add up to 30 students to your Teacher Account

You can now add up to 30 students to your Free Teacher Account. Take full advantage of your Kodable Free Trial and add your entire class to begin saving and tracking student progress.

New Pricing 

Kodable Curriculum Materials

Pricing for Kodable is now simpler than ever.  Purchase a site license for your entire school at a single flat rate, and get access to the complete Kodable Curriculum– now and forever.

Fresh Website Design (NEW)

Kodable Programming Curriculum

Visit Kodable.com and take a look at our redesigned homepage. If you have not signed up for a Teacher Account, enroll in a Free Trial and begin teaching your students to code.

Kodable Web 

Kodable Web

You can now visit game.kodable.com to start playing Kodable anytime, anywhere, right from your Internet Browser.

 

Even more changes are on the way. Contact neal@kodable.com with any questions. 🙂 

 

Learn to Code: New Sequence Activity

Learn to Code: Sequence

Teach your students the fundamentals of sequence with our new fuzzFamily Fever activity! Worksheets and directions are included and available for download below. Happy coding!

Overview

  • Time frame — About 30-45 minutes
  • The fuzzFamily has crash-landed on the planet Smeeborg and needs your help! Fill in the boxes below each maze with the correct commands and cardinal directions to navigate the fuzzFamily to safety.

Materials

  • Pencil
  • fuzzFamily Fever Handout (Download Below)
  • Kodable
  • SMART Board or Project (optional)

 

Learn to Code: Sequence Activity

We have more activities coming soon! Check back for updates. 🙂