Teacher of the Week: Kaye Rueschhoff

Inspired by parents who were teachers, 21 year teaching veteran Kaye Rueschhoff has worked relentlessly to bring herself up to speed in the constantly evolving digital world. Kaye recently shared with us some amazing ways she’s integrating coding across content areas, and this week we are honored to feature her as our Teacher of the Week!  Kaye TOW

Congratulations on being chosen as teacher of the week! Can you start off by telling us a little about your teaching background and how technology has worked its way into what you do?

I am the daughter of retired teachers so education has been a huge part of my life.  I grew up in a small Missouri town where the school was the center of our world.  When I went away to college, teaching was not my first career choice.  However, after many detours and 20 years later, I can’t imagine doing anything else.
Technology has been an evolution for me. Our district became a “bring your own device” school a few years ago and I decided to learn everything I could about the devices and the technology in the world to support them.  I wanted my students to have the most cutting edge information and curriculum support possible, which meant that I had to learn everything I could and very quickly. I have attended every workshop, conference, and professional development opportunity possible in order to make that happen.

 What do you love most about teaching?

I have spent most of my teaching career as a first grade educator.  I love the evolution that happens with 6 and 7 year old children as they learn to read and experience many new things and topics for the first time. The challenge of finding the best way to teach and reach each individual student is one I take very seriously.  I love learning how they learn and then adapting my teaching style in order to ensure their success.

Why do you think it’s important for kids to learn how to code and develop 21st century technology skills?

Coding and computer skills is the world of these students, especially first graders.  They don’t know a world without these devices.  It is very important for them to know how the devices work in order to problem solve how to fix errors and navigate situations when the software or device does not work correctly. Many of the careers and future opportunities for current students have not even been invented yet, but coding and computer science skills will always be an asset for these children.kaye TOW kids

What is one of the most exciting things you have seen happen with coding in your classroom?

I have students in my class this year that have parents that don’t speak English at home.  These students struggle with every other subject in school and often feel defeated.  They are smart kids that just don’t get the practice in English needed to keep up with their peers. Coding is something that they are successful with.  They are the leaders and helpers during our computer science time and anytime we are using technology.  This is a universal language that builds self-esteem for these kids and helps them learn in all of the other subject areas.

What are some challenges you have had implementing coding in your school?

My administration supports this type of learning as long as I integrate it with other subject areas and show learning growth.

What is one coding goal you have as an instructor?

I would like to learn to code on my own.  I have started several coding classes, but it requires much more time than I can give.  When I was able to take classes, however, I was a better teacher because it helped me understand some of the foundation behind the coding programs and the language used. For my career, my dream would be to be part of a computer science school in our school district.

We have to ask: How do you make time to take care of yourself during the school year?

When I am not at school, I am usually in the gym.

What do you think is the most important thing for kids to take away from their education?KAYE TOW kid

I want these students to never stop learning. I want them to realize that boredom is a choice and there is always something new to discover.  Even though we can find out most everything we need to know on the internet, there is always something to be gained from human interaction and discussion.  Ideas are powerful and should be used to good.

Lastly, what do you like to do for fun outside of teaching?

I love to learn about technology and new gadgets. I LOVE sports and watch football, hockey, and baseball. I am in the gym or Zumba class daily.  Shopping is my sport.

Teacher of the Week: Melika Panneri

Our Teacher of the Week caught our eye in a news feature on the amazing work that she’s doing for The Wilson School. We were lucky enough to catch up with Melika Panneri and learn more about how she took coding from a 6th grade capstone project and built a technology program that prepares younger students for complex projects in later grades.  MELIKA_3-1

What do you love most about teaching?

I love that every day is a new day and there’s always something new to learn. Kids say what they think and that’s refreshing. I love seeing kids figure things out on their own and apply it to life.

Why do you think it’s important for kids to learn how to code and develop 21st century technology skills?

Coding is about challenges and problems and asks for kids to deal with it- it’s not just math and science. Kids grow their tolerance for frustration when they hit a wall and can’t figure something out.  Jobs will eventually need a background in computer science, whether you’re a programmer or not, and exposing kids to coding prepares them for that.

What is one of the most exciting things you have seen happen with coding at your school?

I started Think Camp this summer and I ran a session on creative coding. I  have never seen kids that excited in my life. We used a variety of coding options and tools, but the entire time kids were excited beyond anything I’ve ever seen. I think if they could have exploded, they would have! IMG_0481

What are some challenges you have had implementing coding in your school?

Getting other teachers to see the value in it is always challenging and talking about it is not enough. Once people see students learning it and watch me teach they start to understand and want to be a part of it. I have an ELA teacher who works with me to integrate ELA with coding. We did a coding project with 5th graders on explaining idioms to the world. An example was the idiom, “you crack me up.” A student created this scence, with an egg cracking and laughing, and he coded every bit himself. It’s a challenge showing that coding is not just science or math.

What is one coding goal you have as an instructor?

I’d like to get into more complicated possibilities for 5th and 6th graders. I learn a little bit more every year, and if I keep l learning I’ll be able to help kids dive deeper. I started them in 2nd grade and now they’re coming in with projects they’ve made over the weekend, things they have built over the summer. They want more and I want to be able to teach them and learn from them.

We have to ask: How do you make time to take care of yourself during the school year?

I’ve learned to get a little better at saying no when I’ve hit my limits.

What do you think is the most important thing for kids to take away from their education?

To have the opportunity to have that crazy joyful moment where they’ve figured out what works best for them to learn. Learning how to learn, and being excited about learning.

Lastly, what do you like to do for fun outside of teaching? montavalo

I love to travel when we have the time. My final student teaching was in Australia, and that was incredible. We like to go to New York City and San Francisco when we can.  I also love graphic design and real estate.

Thank you, Melika, for sharing your experiences and perspective with us!

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McKinna Elementary: Anne Jenks and Letty Batista

This week’s feature is an example of how collaboration and teamwork can set the tone for innovation and success. We are honored to introduce you to Principal Anne Jenks and Kindergarten teacher Letty Batista, both of McKinna Elementary in Oxnard, California.

Can you tell us about your path to becoming a school leader? anne jenks tow

Anne: I’ve been in education for about 22 years; I taught for 13 before becoming an administrator.  Teaching was a second career for me, I never dreamed of being a teacher until I started tutoring a 15 year old boy through Project Literacy. I went back to school while working full time, and got a teaching job mmediately. From there, I went back for my  Masters and became an administrator. I came to McKinna in July of 2007.

How did you begin to integrate technology into the work you’re doing at McKinna?

Anne: We started doing weekly raffles for students who were following school expectations- I had a 6th grade girl win an iPod, and she didn’t know what it was or what to do with it. I knew we had to start integrating more technology for our students. We started with the Hour of Code and not everyone could see the value of it right away. I met with teachers and told them, “I’m asking you to do this for one week, as little as 20 minutes a day.” When they did it, they saw the engagement, the resilience in students, and they were on board.

How did McKinna go from the Hour of Code to teaching coding daily? Letty TOW

Letty: Ms. Jenks came to me and told me the Hour of Code was coming up. She gave me the iPads and said, “I’m asking you to do 1 hour of coding with the Hour of Code.” I immediately saw fascination in my students, the kind of joy that we try  so hard to teach kids. It completely blew me away. After that, I asked Ms. Jenks if I could continue to teach coding and use Kodable with my class. I teach a bilingual class, and many of my students speak indigenous languages— we have so many standards to cover and so little time. I asked Ms. Jenks if I could adjust my schedule by shifting my calendar time to later in the day and she was supportive. The schedule shift allowed me to start getting coding time in daily.

How did you develop your instruction off-screen as you began teaching coding beyond the hour of code?

Letty: We were just getting started and learning together in the first year. The next year, I signed myself up for an Hour of Code workshop and I started teaching coding with unplugged activities. I needed to start on the right path to help them understand coding and how we can use it for math, reading, writing, storytelling, playing with blocks, etc. I started teaching coding with a curriculum and immediately noticed that children started practicing communicating in English naturally. Coding helps develop ESL students’ verbal skills and has improved students’ confidence.

What are you coding goals for the school?

Anne: I would like everyone to agree to 1 hour of coding a week, but I understand the time crunch that exists. I feel that coding is something that teaches “soft skills”- resilience, collaboration, the skills that are embedded in the Common Core. These make the learning more exciting and more relevant. Coding spills over into all of the subject areas and that is the value in it.

How are teachers supported as they get started with teaching programming?

Letty: Ms. Jenks and I present a lot for staff,  and there’s a lot of communication around what we’re doing. All of our kindergarten teachers kind of set the pace for everyone else. Our first graders come in already knowing so much, the first grade teachers have their gamefaces on and are ready when their new students come in. We have an after school coding club and we are hoping to start doing monthly events with students and families, especially in the upper grades.

What advice do you have for schools wanting to get started with coding?

Anne: You should begin with the Hour of Code in December, it’s a  great starting place to introduce teachers to coding. Teacher buy-in is absolutely vital. With everyone trying to wrap their head around the Common Core, asking for one week of something new seems doable. It’s one hour, there are options. The Hour of Code is a great starting point. kodable kids

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Teacher of the Week: Jaime Chanter

We are honored to introduce Jaime Chanter, of Horace Mann and Grant Elementary. Jaime’s teaching career was sparked by learning the value of helping others, and we’re inspired after hearing how one teacher’s passion is equipping so many students with technology!

Congratulations on being chosen as teacher of the week! Can you start off by telling us a little bit about your teaching background? jaime chanter

When I was in high school, I worked at a grocery store that helped individuals with disabilities join the workforce.  The teaching bug bit me when I saw employees teaching skills and participants graduating from the program. I knew I really want to get into Special Education and was credentialed in PK-12 in Special Education and PK-8 in General Education. My heart and soul was always in Special Education and after teaching a General Education first grade class, I switched districts to do a 3-5 intervention. I was a huge advocate for inclusion in General Education classrooms, which spiraled into technology. Technology was  key to help level the playing field for students with disabilities in the inclusion environment, and 2 years ago a position in the district opened for a Curriculum and Tech teacher. Now I work with 600+ kids and get to help teachers integrate technology into their classrooms.

What do you love most about teaching?

I love the excitement when I walk into a classroom-  the kids are super excited to work and be engaged.  Students love what we’re doing, it’s fun and they’re willing to work because they want to learn.

Why do you think it’s important for kids to learn how to code and develop 21st century technology skills?

Coding makes something happen. Kids have to start with an idea,work at it, and then make something out of it. It involves critical thinking, collaboration, failure, and perseverance. Kids crave to go back and try something else, they want to make progress.

What is one of the most exciting things you have seen happen with coding in your classroom?

Doing the hour of code has been so exciting for us. Seeing kids and teachers experience coding for the first time and get hooked on it has been really exciting. At home, my 3 year old uses Kodable, and my other daughters love coding. They’re so proud of what they are doing.

What are some challenges you have had implementing coding in your school? future club jaime chanter

Time is a huge challenge. Teachers are always pressed for a time and it’s not always easy to see how important coding is if they haven’t seen the results. Money is also hard. Kids can use free apps and websites for a long time, but it’s so nice to get robots and subscriptions that make apps better. Finding a way to budget time and money is really important. I started a Future Club with a focus on coding, robotics, gaming, and making.  Three schools (soon to be four) hold weekly one hour meetings before school for alternating groups of students.  We had such a huge response, we had to rethink budget, space, and time!  I’m so lucky to work with amazing teachers who volunteer their time to lead the club with me.  My administration has been so generous, which is huge to have that support.  I’ve  also written grants, which has been a really successful way to get what we need.

What is one coding goal you have as an instructor?

We have a local company called Hyland Software that held a contest for high school students. The students got to work together to develop an app and students from our high school won. They were awarded with an internship through the company, and  I would love to see some of my current students get that opportunity. I want the kids in our coding club to have that chance, I really want to get our k-5 kids ready for that project in high school, maybe find or even start one for elementary students.

We have to ask: How do you make time to take care of yourself during the school year?

I wake up at 4:45 on school days and do 1 hour of spin class. I don’t check my phone; that hour is mine and mine alone. I sacrifice sleep for it, but it’s so worth it. It makes the whole day better. I’m more productive, energetic, and happier. I’m awake and feeling good!

What do you think is the most important thing for kids to take away from their education?

Skills. Less focus on content and information,  but to be able to communicate, collaborate, think critically, get creative. Student led passion and discovery.

Lastly, what do you like to do for fun outside of teaching?

I have 6 kids. I like to take and edit photos of them and turn them into movies. I add text and audio to them, I love to get creative with it. I want the movies to be really special for my kids later in life.

jaime chanter family jaime chanter project

 

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Teacher of the Week: Polly Meissner

Watch Froz-N-Code, inspired by Polly!
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Congratulations on being chosen as teacher of the week! Can you start off by telling us a little bit about your teaching background? 

I work with 8 elementary schools doing coding and programming as a Media Specialist. I get to work two full days a week at Loess Hills Elementary, which never feels like enough time. Over the past 20 years, I’ve taught library in different capacities. I did 1:1 computers at the high school level and got “the tech bug.” We started a student help desk and trained students to repair computers for each other. Now, Loess Hills is going 1:1, and the high school students are working on the computers and bringing them to the elementary school kids.

What do you love most about teaching?

I love seeing kids “get it.” That look on their face when something becomes meaningful; a connection to the world, the class, or to each other. I see it a lot with coding- when one student gets it and they want to show someone else. It’s amazing to see them buy into it, feel proud, even be a little amazed with themselves. I often see it in coding with the kids who struggle a little more, and it’s such an eye opener for the students who typically get everything right away. It’s a huge boost of self esteem for kids who aren’t always in the position to be the “go to” person for help from their classmates.

Why do you think it’s important for kids to learn how to code and develop 21st century technology skills?

It teaches so many problem solving skills and kids see that there are multiple ways to do things. Students start learning that we can do things differently and recognize that they can use their own skills to come up with a plan and make it happen. Our kids are maybe missing that in other areas. Technology promotes collaboration to solve problems and teamwork.

What is one of the most exciting things you have seen happen with coding in your classroom?

I worked with a small group of 2nd graders last year and we had a student arrive from another country and was very far behind. Building a relationship with her through working on coding together and solving problems really helped her progress. Coding helped us build a relationship,  give her self confidence, and help her adjust. That’s what I love about kids and coding- they know that a mistake just means try again; it’s okay to try a few times.

What are some challenges you have had implementing coding in your school?

Our story is interesting because we started with a cohort of teachers (1 in each grade grade) bringing coding into the classroom. Scheduling was probably the biggest challenge; I travel and can only be at Loess Hills two days a week. I want to be able get into the classrooms more, time is always a challenge.

What is one coding goal you have as an instructorPolly Meissner TOW

I want to be the Kodable guru that everyone can go to!  I want to learn every part of the program, so I need to make time go through it all myself. Coding doesn’t come that easy to me,  and I want to learn everything about what you guys are designing so I can help my teachers get it into their classrooms.

We have to ask: How do you make time to take care of yourself during the school year?

I love to read. I have three daughters, but I try to take 30 minutes a day for uninterrupted alone time. Sometimes it’s listening to a book in my car during my commute; I love getting taken away into a story for a bit.

What do you think is the most important thing for kids to take away from their education?

To become a lifelong learner. It scares me how many adults just focus on work and life and stop learning. You have to be willing to reevaluate your work and make changes. Ask yourself, “How can I make myself better?” Always keep learning, don’t get stuck in a debilitating rut.

Lastly, what do you like to do for fun outside of teaching? 

I have four kids, and we live on a farm. My daughters raise their own cattle and our family does the fair circuit. We enjoy the farm life activities; I like to leave the city and get to go home to my family on the farm.

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Teacher of the Week: Episode 3

As a student, what I loved most about school was knowing I was loved and appreciated by my teachers. The experiences I had being cared for as a person by my own teachers shaped the way I interacted with my students when I became a teacher. I was reminded of this last week, when I spoke with Marilou Schantz, of Washington Elementary in Clinton, Oklahoma.

Marilou emanates compassion and love for every student she crosses paths with, and I was inspired remembering how a deep care for students as people can be a driving force in the work of an educator. Screen Shot 2015-09-14 at 7.04.46 PM

Congratulations on being chosen as teacher of the week! Can you start off by telling us a little about your teaching background?

This is my 9th year teaching. I’ve taught 1st grade, 2nd grade, 3rd grade, 4th grade “Gifted and Talented”, and after following my daughter to her school to teach 6th grade, I’m in my second year of 5th and 6th grade science at Washington Elementary!

What do you love most about teaching?

The kids; just getting to love them. I always tell them, “You’re mine, you’re mine forever.”

Why do you think it’s important for kids to learn how to code and develop 21st century technology skills?

To keep up with the world around them. I want to see my kids be able to do anything, and to know that they can do anything. My class motto is, “Don’t say ‘I can’t’ because you admit you’re not trying. Believe you can, no matter what.”

What is one of the most exciting things you have seen happen with coding in your classroom?

They don’t want to stop! They want to do it all of the time.

What are some challenges you have had implementing coding in your school?

Not everyone wants to do it just yet. There’s always an element of being afraid to try it, with anything new. For me, I just dive right in. I’m not afraid- whatever it is, you have to just try it. I tell my kids that and I do it; I show them you have to just try.

What is one coding goal you have as an instructor?

For kids to take it home and show their parents, their friends. Share it, show someone else, be excited about what we’re doing.

We have to ask: How do you make time to take care of yourself during the school year?

I run marathons! I run, I get kids to run with me. I’ve had a few kids do 5ks with me. You have to make time between the time you don’t think you have- you have to do it.

What do you think is the most important thing for kids to take away from their education?

For them to believe that they can be anything, and to believe it whole heartedly. To know that they’re loved, every single one of them. In here, in my classroom, they are all loved and appreciated and they know it.

Lastly, what do you like to do for fun outside of teaching?

I have two daughters, I like to hang out with my girls whenever we  can. We like to watch movies and be together.

Thank you, Marilou! We are inspired by the love you have for your students and the expectations you have for them to reach their potential.

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Teacher of the Week: Episode 2

jen gilbert imageMeet Jen Gilbert, Kodable Teacher of the Week

Our featured teacher this week is no stranger to Kodable. Jen is an active contributor to our weekly #KidsCanCode Twitter chat, and was one of the awesome classroom hosts on our Kodable Road Trip tour last year.

I got a chance to chat with Jen this week and learn about her unique teaching path that includes higher education, frisbee dogs, and working relentlessly to get kids coding!

Congratulations on being Kodable Teacher of the Week! How did you get into teaching and when did coding become a part of the work you do?

I began my teaching career in Chicago, and after a few years decided to pursue a Master’s degree in Science Education at Depaul University. I took time off to focus on Frisbee dog work and travel, I was doing shows, and decided that I didn’t want to return to Chicago. I took a local K-3 technology assistant position and it’s now year three for me at Middlefork. Coding at Middlefork started with the hour of code, and I realized we could make it into a before-school coding club. I teamed up with our PE teacher and had the support of the entire staff and administration. From coding club, coding has grown to be the work I want to do with students.

What do you love most about teaching?

Elementary is new for me and I just love the age group. The kids are the best part of being a teacher, they’re why I do it. This age group is so awesome and fun, they make the experience for me.

Why do you think it’s important for kids to learn how to code and develop 21st century technology skills?

Technology Encourages curious nature and problem solving skills. It’s a vehicle to engage students.  There’s so much excitement around robots, apps, Kodable. Using skills for this kind of work and engaging in challenges prepares kids for the next step in their education.

What is one of the most exciting things you have seen happen with coding in your classroom?

Seeing it become a part of the school community and culture. It’s become part of the conversation around what we’re doing at our school. A culture around technology and code has grown from something we did in the morning to something we do. I get stopped by parents and siblings in the neighborhood and they’re excited about it. Younger siblings are coming into the school excited about getting to do what their brother or sister has done, and that’s exciting to see.

What is one coding goal you have as an instructor?

Integration. We can continue to do amazing things and grow the club, but we’ll really feel like we are making it when we can embed activities into the work teachers are already doing.

We have to ask: How do you make time to take care of yourself during the school year?

I do work with dogs. I try to make it a priority over the summer. It can be consuming to be doing webinars, teaching, and Professional Development. On the weekends when I do my work with dogs, I can recharge and set everything on a shelf for a day two. Jen Gilbert blog image

What do you think is the most important thing for kids to take away from their education?

Self confidence. Seeing kids realize they can take on any challenge is so important. When I see kids asking questions on their own, away from school, I think we’ve done our job.

Lastly, what do you like to do for fun outside of teaching?

I do a little bit of work in design and I’m trying to learn new maker projects. Any project that I can get absorbed in, it’s for me.

 

Thank you, Jen! We are grateful that you shared your experience with us and that you’re equipping so many students with 21st Century technology skills!

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Introducing Kodable Teacher of the Week : Episode 1

 

 

Kodable Teacher of the Week

Teachers are absolute rockstars and the world doesn’t hear enough about it. We know how hard our teachers are working to get their kids coding and developing 21st Century skills and want everyone else to know, too.

We’re excited to announce we will be introducing you to a new, code busting teacher each week. It is our goal to spotlight teachers bringing coding to their schools, and to let their stories inspire others.

Meet Brian Adams, our first ever Teacher of the Week!

BrianAdams

Brian is a Pennsylvania native, with 20 years of teaching under his belt.  Mr. Adams is the Instructional Technology teacher and coach for k-3 students at Ridge Park Elementary School in Conshohoken, Pennsylvania.

We were lucky enough to catch up with Mr. Adams before he embarks on year 21, and learn about how he has successfully implemented coding in his school.

Congratulations on being chosen as teacher of the week! Can you start off by telling us about your teaching background and how you got started with teaching code?

My first nine years of teaching were spent teaching second grade. I switched to k-3 Technology, and a few years ago we started a really big transition with iPads. I had heard about different coding apps, but was looking for more than just “drill and practice” and I really wanted my students engaged with the content. I found Kodable and played through the whole thing; I fell in love with it. We started with 24 students sharing 14 iPads, but once the web version was released I could get all of my students on at once. We currently have our 1st and 2nd graders using it, and 3rd graders trying to come back and log in to do more!

What do you love most about teaching?

I love seeing the students engaged and enjoying what  they’re doing. It’s really great to be able to see their excitement and willingness to take it as far as they can.

Why do you think it’s important for kids to learn how to code and develop 21st century technology skills? 

I’m really drawn to the problem solving aspect. We’ve used Kodable individually and collaboratively with our students. Our 1st graders have  started off working with a partner, because it’s a new way of thinking for them. For them, it’s huge getting their fuzzes through the maze and learning to be persistent. They have to learn how to try and retry- maybe even 10 times. It forces kids to ask, “how can I learn from my mistakes and improve?”

What are some challenges you have had implementing coding in your school?

There haven’t been too many challenges. I’m fortunate that my Administration has always been on board and supportive from the beginning; they’re a group of progressive thinkers. Early on, we struggled with limited devices but the Web has allowed us to get all of our students on at once.

What is one of the most exciting things you have seen happen with coding in your classroom? 

I had a mom come into the classroom and see the poster that showed skills kids were building with coding. She was a math major in college, and to see her simply in awe really felt good. I had my own perspective on it, but then to have a workforce perspective come in was awesome. With students, I had a 2nd grade student log in at home and complete everything in a few weeks. I couldn’t believe that he had successfully worked through it that fast, I kept double checking him in class and he could explain every concept. I brought him to the parent council meeting for the district. He sat with parents and iPads and explained Kodable and problem solving to all of them. He was able to explain the value of it to parents, and that was really special.

We have to ask: How do you make time to take care of yourself during the school year?

Sometimes, it’s just saying the day is over and putting school aside. The to do list can wait. I make sure I make time to exercise. For fun, the Phillies! 

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What do you think is the most important thing for kids to take away from their education? 

It sounds cliche, but a love and enjoyment for learning. Things can pile up; tests and papers. It’s important for them to find the part of it that they enjoy somewhere in there.

Thank you, Mr. Adams, for your 20+ years of serving students, and for being our first Kodable Teacher of the Week! 

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